Man ‘plays’ badminton with NEOWISE comet in viral image

Man 'plays' badminton with NEOWISE comet in viral photo

Which is 1 way to remain energetic throughout a pandemic.

An English male took a picture of himself “taking part in” badminton with the NEOWISE comet above the Quantock Hills in Somerset, England, British information company SWNS studies.

Laurence Douglas-Greene explained he wished to produce an impression no 1 experienced seen nonetheless, irrespective of the comet acquiring been seen on Earth given that July 7.

This stunning picture shows a man pretending to play badminton with Comet NEOWISE above the Quantock Hills in Somerset. (Credit: SWNS)

This amazing image shows a gentleman pretending to enjoy badminton with Comet NEOWISE higher than the Quantock Hills in Somerset. (Credit: SWNS)

NEOWISE COMET Noticed Traveling Above 1,800-FOOT MANSTONE ROCK IN ENGLAND

“I go out two times a month to capture the Milky Way and comprehensive moon illustrations or photos anyway as astronomy has often fascinated me,” Douglas-Greene told SWNS. “I wanted to make one thing that nobody has assumed of or done nevertheless, to my information. So I saved examining the climate and planned this location since the Quantocks Hills are like my next home — it is an great area to capture photos of wildlife, landscape and the night sky.”

Douglas-Greene, who took the image on July 17, stated it was a little bit of operate to preserve the badminton racket in the chilly air, and he needed many tries to get it correct. In the long run, he manufactured it operate.

“It did acquire me a number of attempts working back again and forth but I’m delighted with the in general outcome.”

NASA CAPTURES Amazing Image OF NEOWISE COMET

NEOWISE, which can be noticed with the bare eye, has been seen since July 7, NASA said on its web site.

“The comet usually takes about 6,800 several years to make one lap all-around its extensive, stretched out orbit, so it is not going to check out the inner photo voltaic method yet again for lots of hundreds of many years,” the agency explained.

The comet’s closest approach to Earth was on July 22, at a distance of about 64 million miles.

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